Music and the New Economy

Music and the New Economy

In Rainbows is a great album by a great band.  That is not really a controversial statement as Radiohead is one of the most beloved bands of my life and In Rainbows is considered their finest work since Kid A.  (This isn’t going to turn in to a discussion of the best Radiohead albums, but that would be fun for another time). In Rainbows was released in October 2007 and it was a watershed moment in the history of music and the way music was sold. Radiohead released the album on their own website for an interesting price–whatever you thought it was worth.  I remember buying it and I think I paid $1.  I paid this paltry amount not because I think a new Radiohead album is worth $1, but I wasn’t sure I believed the offer.  I had never paid for anything what I thought it was worth. We might not have realized this, but the world of music marketing hasn’t been the same since. Artists from all over the globe have taken control over their own music to levels never before seen–and there appears to be no end in sight. Case in point: Father John Misty (aka Joshua Tillman).  The former member of the Fleet Foxes and creator of the fantastic debut album Fear Fun in 2012, Tillman released his follow up album I Love You, Honeybear earlier this year.  To mark the occasion, he released his new album to the world for free…with a catch.  A catch that actually caught me off guard. On his website, Tillman released his album in a format called SAP.  Here is how he described the...